Category Archives: Abstract Art

Artist Spotlight: Craig Poindexter

Nieto Fine Art Hosts Craig Poindexter 

Craig Poindexter is a full-time painter who has lived and worked in San Francisco since 2001. One of his main objectives has always been to prove that beauty can be found in almost everything around us, even in items that most people often find repugnant. In order to prove his claims regarding these traditionally unappealing elements, Poindexter cites abandoned factories, a bad acid trip and industrial cityscapes as sources of inspiration. Continue reading Artist Spotlight: Craig Poindexter

The History of Contemporary Art

Contemporary Art

If you’re familiar with Native American artists like John Nieto, you’ve likely enjoyed his culturally rich and contemporary american indian art. In today’s modern age, people are quick to throw around terms like “modern” and “contemporary,” when describing works of art from Nieto and other painters. But what does “contemporary” actually mean in today’s art scene? Is it the same or different from modern art? Although the words contemporary and modern can be used interchangeably in some situations, when it comes to art, modern art and contemporary art represents to two different eras.

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The History of Fauvism and Its Affect on Abstract Art

Bold Fauvist Style Art Was Not Without Early Critics

Vivid colors, robust brushstrokes, plain forms, lawless creativity — the fauvist movement was impulsive by nature. It exemplified revolutionary sentiments that fought against the norm. Fauvist artists like Raoul Dufy boasted of radical artistry that went against tradition: “I don’t follow any system. All the laws you can lay down are only so many props to be cast aside when the hour of creation arrives.” Continue reading The History of Fauvism and Its Affect on Abstract Art

Emerging American Indian Artist Finds Voice in Graffiti Art

Contemporary Wall Art Goes Public with Native American Graffiti Artists

Contemporary American Indian Art is finding a voice in unconventional art forms. Modern American Indian artists are using graffiti to represent Native American themes and concepts. Continue reading Emerging American Indian Artist Finds Voice in Graffiti Art

Beginning a Collection of Contemporary Art Decor

Collectors Should Buy What they Like and Know Abstract Art Prints are Far Superior to Posters

Contemporary art decor serves as an unapologetic self-expression in your home. Whether you are an avid conformist or outspoken maverick, a personal art collection clearly articulates thoughts, convictions, and inner beliefs that are hard to fully verbalize with words. If you are at the beginning of your art journey, knowing the best place to begin may seem nebulous. There is no proven and predetermined process that will provide you a path to respect and success as an art collector. There are however, helpful tips and concepts that will help you start out in the right direction with your collecting. Continue reading Beginning a Collection of Contemporary Art Decor

Contemporary Art and the Impact of Abstract Expressionism

Abstract Expressionism, Action Painting and Contemporary Art

Long hailed as the leader in modern art, Paris would take 2nd place to New York during the emergence of a new contemporary art movement that flourished in the 40’s and 50’s. Many European artists fled Europe to escape political unrest and fascist regimes in the 1930’s, bringing with them strong Surrealist ideologies and methods. Surrealism with its focus on the unconscious, would inspire American artists and encourage artistic experimentation with myths and symbols that is inherent in Abstract Expressionism. Continue reading Contemporary Art and the Impact of Abstract Expressionism

The History of Abstract Art

Various Cultures and their Interpretations of Abstract Art

Throughout the centuries, the creation, depiction, representation and evolution of art has depended heavily on a culture’s beliefs, daily lifestyle, religious convictions and natural resources. For example, artists in China, Japan, India and Europe enjoyed access to metal, good clay, brushes and pigments. This allowed them to develop more elaborate techniques that created concise illusions of natural things and spiritual concepts. Adversely, in Africa and Oceania where the limitation of materials and harsh climatic conditions created barriers for artists, artistic and spiritual themes were often represented through symbolism and idols that related to concepts. Continue reading The History of Abstract Art